Is 85 Too Low For Blood Sugar

What Is Considered A Normal Blood Sugar Range

Low Blood Sugar vs High Blood Sugar

Blood sugar, or blood glucose, levels are typically measured using a scale of grams per deciliter or millimoles per liter . This level will tend to fluctuate throughout the course of a day, with the lowest readings during periods of fasting and the highest coming shortly after a meal. The normal blood sugar range for a healthy person is about 83 mg/dl to 120 mg/dl .

A healthy person’s body is able to regulate blood glucose levels very tightly, resulting in a predictable normal blood sugar range. This means that blood glucose levels will tend to normalize fairly quickly, even though they can rise sharply after a meal, during what is known as the postprandial period. For a person without a blood glucose disorder, a fasting blood sugar level should be about 83 mg/dl . This means that his or her blood glucose should be at, or below, this level when he or she first wakes up in the morning. For many healthy people, the fasting blood glucose level is lower, at around 70 mg/dl .

What Are The Signs Of Hypoglycemia

An individual may frequently wake up in the middle of the night as a result of nighttime hypoglycemia. In other instances, though, people may know if they experienced hypoglycemia during their sleep if they notice the following symptoms:

  • Waking up with a headache
  • Waking up in a sweat
  • Getting unusual feelings of tiredness throughout the day
  • Experiencing anxiety or heart palpitations
  • Feeling confused, dizzy or weak

Normal Blood Sugar Levels

It is important to work with your doctor to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. The following is a list of healthy blood sugar levels.

If an individual has type 1 diabetes the blood sugar should be the following:

  • Before meals: From 90 to 130 mg/dL for adults
  • After meals : Less than 180 mg/dL for adults
  • At bedtime: From 90 to 150 mg/dL for adults

If an individual has type 2 diabetes, levels should be the following:

  • Before meals: From 70 to 130 mg/dL for adults
  • After meals : Less than 180 mg/dL for adults

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What Is A Normal A1c

Now that you have your A1c number, lets look at what that number actually tells you. The American Diabetes Association has established the following guidelines:

This does NOT mean that you need an A1c of less than 5.7% if youre living with diabetes. It means that if you do NOT live with diabetes, your A1c is expected to be below 5.7%. There are different recommendations for what an appropriate A1c is for people living with diabetes.

I had a chance to asked Dr. Anne Peters, MD, Director, USC Clinical Diabetes Program and Professor of Clinical Medicine Keck School of Medicine of USC as well as Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, owner and Clinical Director of Integrated Diabetes Services and author of Think Like a Pancreas, what their perspectives are on a good A1c target:

Dr. Peters:

The A1c target should be whatever is best given the persons clinical situation. For athletes, too many lows can limit performance, for someone who is pregnant it should be < 6%, for an older person the target should be higher. I generally think an A1c target of 6.0 7.0% is ideal and data shows that going below 7% has fairly little impact on complications. Basically, Id rather see someone with an A1c of 6.9% and low blood sugar variability than an A1c of 6.2% with lots of variability

Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE:

To learn more about blood sugar levels, please read What are Normal Blood Sugar Levels.

When Glucose Level Is Low Should I Take My Insulin

I was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes 11 years age, and have been taking insulin injections for the last 6 years. I recently fell out after taking an injection when my glucose klevel was all ready low. I don’t recall anyone ever warning me not to. Has anyone ever gotten advise on this subject?

Hi,I have read this somewhere and i think would be helpful to you.A low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia or an insulin reaction, is defined as a blood glucose level below 60 to 70 mg/dl. It is usually companied by one or more of the symptoms described below. Low blood sugars or insulin reactions can occur whenever insulin is used. Although less frequent, it can also occur with use of drugs that stimulate insulin production in Type 2 diabetes, such as Diabenese, Glyburide, Glipizide, and Starlix.

Hypoglycemia symptoms vary greatly. Lows may occur with no symptoms, minor symptoms, or full-blown symptoms. They will vary from person to person and from one low to the next in the same person. A single symptom may make you aware that your blood sugar has become low, or you may suddenly become aware of several symptoms at once. Symptoms are created both by the effect of the low blood sugar on the brain and other organs, and by the effects of adrenaline and glucagon which are released in large quantities to raise the blood sugar.

Insulin Reaction Symptoms

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What Are The Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar How Do I Know I’m Experiencing A Low Blood Sugar

All this talk about lows, and we haven’t told you what to watch out for! Shame on us.

The signs and symptoms of low blood sugars happen quickly, can vary a lot, and can even be different each time. The American Diabetes Association has a comprehensive list:

  • Shakiness
  • Tingling or numbness in the lips or tongue
  • Headaches

Determining The Right A1c Goal For You

Just because a normal blood sugar range of 70 to 130 mg/dL is considered the healthiest doesnt necessarily mean thats the appropriate goal range for you especially if you have type 1 diabetes, or take insulin as a person with type 2 diabetes.

The reason this may not be the right goal for you is that extremely tight blood sugar management in people taking insulin can potentially lead to frequent low blood sugars which can be dangerous.

Achieving extremely tight blood sugar management, like a range of 70 to 130 mg/dL, also often requires a strict nutrition plan, more frequent than usual blood sugar monitoring, precise medication management, and most importantly, years of experience studying your own blood sugar levels.

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What If The 15

If you dont feel better after three tries, or if your symptoms get worse, call your healthcare provider or 911. Healthcare providers can use a medication called glucagon. They inject it with a needle or squirt it up your nose. Glucagon is also available for home use. Your healthcare provider can prescribe it and teach a family member or friend how to use it in the event of severe hypoglycemia.

Is 82 Low For Blood Sugar

What is Low Blood Sugar (Hypoglycemia)?

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For most people without diabetes, blood sugar levels before meals hover around 70 to 80 mg/dL. For some people, 60 is normal for others, 90. When you diet or fast, the liver keeps your levels normal by turning fat and muscle into sugar. A few people’s levels may fall somewhat lower.

Likewise, is 87 too low for blood sugar? High-Normal Fasting Blood Sugar Above 87 mg/dL Could Signal Diabetes Risk. Men and women with fasting plasma glucose levels in the high-normal range of 87 to 99 mg/dL should be counseled with regard to weight and lifestyle, and assessing their lipid profiles.

Beside this, what level is too low for blood sugar?

A blood sugar level below 70 mg/dL is low and can harm you. A blood sugar level below 54 mg/dL is a cause for immediate action. You are at risk for low blood sugar if you have diabetes and are taking any of the following diabetes medicines: Insulin.

Is 85 too low for blood sugar?

Our survival mandates that the body tightly regulate glucose levels and prevent hypoglycemia. When blood glucose levels fall into the 80 to 85 mg/dL range, the body slows or stops secretion of insulin. The lower limit of normal blood glucose levels in adults is 70 mg/dL .

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How To Avoid Diabetic Ketoacidosis

It might have been a really long time since youve been in diabetic ketoacidosis , or maybe youve never had it.

But if you have Type 1 diabetes, you are at risk. Sometimes when you havent recently experienced a situation, you kind of forget about what you were told to do for prevention or treatment. Thats why a refresher might be a great idea!

What Are Blood Sugar Goals During Treatment For Diabetes

The 2007 guidelines of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists encourage patients to achieve glycemic levels as near normal as possible without inducing hypoglycemia . Specifically:

Fasting blood sugar: < 110 mg/dl

Two hours after a meal: < 140 mg/dl

Hemoglobin A1c: 6.5% or less

The American Diabetes Association recommends normal or near-normal blood sugar levels, and defines tight control as:

1) pre-meal and fasting glucose levels of 70130 mg/dl

2) sugars under 180 mg/dl two hours after start of a meal

3) hemoglobin A1c under 7%.

A hemoglobin A1c of 7% is equivalent to average blood sugar levels of 160 mg/dl . Hemogobin A1c of 6% equals, roughly, average blood sugar levels of 130 mg/dl . But remember, healthy non-diabetics spend most of their day under 100 mg/dl and have hemoglobin A1cs around 5%.

Diabetic experts actively debate how tightly we should control blood sugar levels. For instance, Dr. Richard K. Bernsteina type 1 diabetic himselfrecommends keeping blood sugar levels under 90 mg/dl almost all the time. If it exceeds 95 mg/dl after a meal, then a change in medication or meal is in order, he says.

Heres the over-simplified tight control debate. On one hand, tight control helps prevent and may reverse some of the devastating consequences of diabetes. On the other hand, tight control in diabetics on insulin and certain other diabetic medications may raise the risk of life-threatening hypoglycemia and may shorten lifespan in other ways.

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The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes: The Definitive Guide

The ketogenic diet has been around for a LONG time. Its popular. Its controversial. Some love it. Some hate it. Some even say it can help your blood sugars stay in better control.

After thoroughly reviewing the scientific literature and trying the ketogenic diet myself for over 6 months, I am ready to unfold everything youve been hearing and let you decide for yourself what you think about the diet that has taken the world and diabetes community by storm.

In this guide to the ketogenic diet and diabetes, I will cover the following:

This guide is relevant for people with any type of diabetes. I will mainly talk about insulin when I discuss how a keto diet affects blood sugar, but some studies also show a possible reduction in certain type 2 medications.

Disclaimer: Please always consult with your medical team before you start a new diet, adjust your medication or change your diabetes management routine.

How Is Hypoglycemia Diagnosed

The only way to know if you have hypoglycemia is to check your blood sugar with a blood glucose meter. Its a small machine that measures blood sugar. Most of these devices use a tiny prick of the finger to take a small amount of blood.

People with hypoglycemia unawareness may need a continuous glucose monitor. These wearable devices measure glucose every few minutes, day and night. An alarm sounds if blood sugar drops too low.

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How Do I Treat An Episode Of Hypoglycemia

The American Diabetes Association recommends the 15-15 rule for an episode of hypoglycemia:

  • Eat or drink 15 grams of carbs to raise your blood sugar.
  • After 15 minutes, check your blood sugar.
  • If its still below 70 mg/dL, have another 15 grams of carbs.
  • Repeat until your blood sugar is at least 70 mg/dL.

If you have symptoms of hypoglycemia but cant test your blood sugar, use the 15-15 rule until you feel better.

Note: Children need fewer grams of carbs. Check with your healthcare provider.

Tips To Prevent Blood Sugar From Dropping At Night

Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar or low blood glucose, occurs when blood glucose levels drop below normalwhich is typically below a level of 70 milligrams per deciliter . With levels more commonly dipping at nighttime, otherwise referred to as nighttime hypoglycemia, this condition affects mostly patients with diabetes.

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Maintaining Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

  • Eat a healthy breakfast containing fiber and protein within an hour of waking up to prevent hypoglycemia.
  • Always eat healthy fats, protein, and fiber with each meal, as this slows the digestive process and the number of carbohydrates released into the bloodstream, keeping blood sugar levels stable.
  • Exercise regularly to burn off extra blood sugar.
  • Drink plenty of water and avoid sugary drinks, such as soda, sports drinks, and juice, as these quickly raise blood sugar levels.
  • Keep a supply of hard candy, juice boxes, or glucose tablets on hand in case of low blood sugar crashes. If your loved one has hypoglycemia, he or she should consume a sugary snack or drink as soon as possible and then recheck his or her levels.

Who Is Most At Risk For Developing Diabetes

Blood Sugar Levels Chart | Includes fasting and after eating

The following categories of people are considered “high-risk” candidates for developing diabetes:

  • Individuals who are overweight or obese
  • Individuals who are 45 years of age or older
  • Individuals with first-degree relatives with diabetes
  • Individuals who are African-American, Alaska Native, American Indian, Asia American, Hispanic/Latino, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islanders,
  • Women who developed diabetes while they were pregnant or gave birth to large babies
  • Individuals with high blood pressure
  • Individuals with high-density lipoprotein below 25 mg/dl or triglyceride levels at or above 250 mg/dl
  • Individuals who have impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance
  • Individuals who are physically inactive engaging in exercise less than three times a week
  • Individuals who have polycystic ovary syndrome, also called PCOS
  • Individuals who have acanthosis nigricans — dark, thick and velvety skin around your neck or armpits

In addition to testing the above individuals at high risk, the American Diabetes Association also recommends screening all individuals age 45 and older.

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How Is It Treated

If you often have symptoms of hypoglycemia, you should see your healthcare provider. Your provider can help you determine the cause. Your provider will also give you guidelines for treating low blood sugar when you are having symptoms.

When you see your provider, be sure to take your notebook or glucose meter with all of the results of your recent blood sugar checks. This helps your provider know whether you are on the right medicines and are taking the right dose at the right time of day. Without this record, it is harder for your provider to help you figure out the cause of your symptoms.

Here are some examples of guidelines your provider may give you:

  • If you have diabetes and you think your blood sugar may be too low, check it with your home meter before treatment, if possible.
  • Always carry some form of sugar you can eat as soon as you have any symptoms of hypoglycemia. The following amounts and types of foods will bring your blood sugar level up:
  • 2 to 5 glucose tablets
  • 1/2 cup fruit juice
  • 1/2 cup regular soda
  • 6 to 8 ounces of skim milk
  • 1/4 to 1/3 cup of raisins
  • 5 to 7 pieces of hard candy like Lifesavers
  • a tube of glucose in gel form
  • 1 tablespoon of molasses, corn syrup, or honey
  • If you still have symptoms 10 to 15 minutes after eating or drinking one of the foods listed above, you may need to eat or drink another portion.
  • If you are about to eat a meal, eat the fruit or drink the juice first and then eat the rest of your meal.
  • Translating Your A1c To A Blood Sugar Level

    Using this easy calculator from the ADA, you can translate your most recent A1C result to an eAG or estimate average glucose level.

    You can also use this translation when working to improve your A1c and achieving closer to normal blood sugar levels. If you know an A1c of 6.5 is an average blood sugar level of 126 mg/dL or a range of 100 to 152 mg/dL, then you can look at your current blood sugar results on your CGM and meter and pinpoint which time of day youre frequently higher than this range.12% = 298 mg/dL or range of 240 347 11% = 269 mg/dL or range of 217 31410% = 240 mg/dL or range of 193 2829% = 212 mg/dL or range of 170 2498% = 183 mg/dL or range of 147 2177% = 154 mg/dL or range of 123 1856% = 126 mg/dL or range of 100 1525% = 97 mg/dL or range of 76 120

    Normal blood sugar levels in a person without diabetes can result in an A1c as low as 4.6 or 4.7 percent and as high as 5.6 percent.

    Just a decade or two ago, it was rare for a person with type 1 diabetes to achieve an A1c result below 6 percent. Thanks to new and improved insulin and better technology like continuous glucose monitors and smarter insulin pumps, more people with diabetes are able to safely achieve A1c levels in the higher 5 percent range.

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